UFO – Aliens

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An unidentified flying object (UFO) is any aerial phenomenon that cannot immediately be identified or explained. Most UFOs are identified on an investigation as conventional objects or phenomena. The term is widely used for claimed observations of extraterrestrial spacecraft.

The term “UFO” (or “UFOB”) was coined in 1953 by the United States Air Force (USAF) to serve as a catch-all for all such reports. In its initial definition, the USAF stated that a “UFOB” was “any airborne object which by performance, aerodynamic characteristics, or unusual features, does not conform to any presently known aircraft or missile type, or which cannot be positively identified as a familiar object”. 

Accordingly, the term was initially restricted to that fraction of cases that remained unidentified after investigation, as the USAF was interested in potential national security reasons and “technical aspects” (see Air Force Regulation 200-2).

During the late 1940s and through the 1950s, UFOs were often referred to popularly as “flying saucers” or “flying discs”. UFO became more widespread during the 1950s, at first in technical literature, but later in general use. UFOs garnered considerable interest during the Cold War, an era associated with a heightened concern for national security, and, more recently, in the 2010s, for unexplained reasons. Various studies have concluded that the phenomenon does not represent a threat to national security or contains anything worthy of scientific pursuit. (e.g., 1951 Flying Saucer Working Party, 1953 CIA Robertson Panel, USAF Project Blue Book, Condon Committee).

The Oxford English Dictionary defines a UFO as “An unidentified flying object; a ‘flying saucer'”. The first published book to use the word was authored by Donald E. Keyhoe.

As an acronym, “UFO” was coined by Captain Edward J. Ruppelt, who headed Project Blue Book, then the USAF’s official UFOs investigation. He wrote, “Obviously the term ‘flying saucer’ is misleading when applied to objects of every conceivable shape and performance. For this reason, the military prefers the more general, if less colourful, name: unidentified flying objects. UFO (pronounced Yoo-foe) for short.” Other phrases that were used officially and that predate the UFO acronym include “flying flapjack”, “flying disc”, “unexplained flying discs”, and “unidentifiable object”.

The phrase “flying saucer” had gained widespread attention after the summer of 1947. On June 24, a civilian pilot named Kenneth Arnold reported seeing nine objects flying in formation near Mount Rainier. Arnold timed the sighting and estimated discs’ speed to be over 1,200 mph (1,931 km/h). At the time, he claimed he described the objects flying in a saucer-like fashion, leading to newspaper accounts of “flying saucers” and “flying discs”. UFOs were commonly referred to colloquially as a “Bogey” by military personnel and pilots during the cold war. The term “bogey” was originally used to report anomalies in radar blips, to indicate possible hostile forces that might be roaming in the area.

In widespread usage, the term UFO came to be used to refer to claims of alien spacecraft. Because of the public and media ridicule associated with the topic, some ufologists and investigators prefer to use terms such as “unidentified aerial phenomenon” (UAP) or “anomalous phenomena”, as in the title of the National Aviation Reporting Center on Anomalous Phenomena (NARCAP). “Anomalous aerial vehicle” (AAV) or “unidentified aerial system” (UAS) are also sometimes used in a military aviation context to describe unidentified targets.

UFOs have been subject to investigations over the years that varied widely in scope and scientific rigour. Governments or independent academics in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Japan, Peru, France, Belgium, Sweden, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay, Mexico, Spain, and the Soviet Union are known to have investigated UFO reports at various times.

Among the best-known government studies are the ghost rockets investigation by the Swedish military (1946–1947), Project Blue Book, previously Project Sign and Project Grudge, conducted by the USAF from 1947 until 1969, the secret U.S. Army/Air Force Project Twinkle investigation into green fireballs (1948–1951), the secret USAF Project Blue Book Special Report No. 14 by the Battelle Memorial Institute, and the Brazilian Air Force’s 1977 Operação Prato (Operation Saucer). France has had an ongoing investigation (GEPAN/SEPRA/GEIPAN) within its space agency Centre national d’études spatiales (CNES) since 1977; Uruguay’s government has had similar research since 1989.

The study of UFOs has received little support in the mainstream scientific literature. Official studies ended in the U.S. in December 1969, following the government scientist Edward Condon’s statement that further study of UFOs could not be justified on the grounds of scientific advancement. The Condon Report and its conclusions were endorsed by the National Academy of Scientists, of which Condon was a member. On the other hand, a scientific review by the UFO subcommittee of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) disagreed with Condon’s conclusion, noting that at least thirty percent of the cases studied remained unexplained and that scientific benefit might be gained by continued study.

Critics argue that all UFO evidence is anecdotal and can be explained as prosaic natural phenomena. Defenders of UFO research counter that knowledge of observational data, other than what is reported in the popular media, is limited in the scientific community, and further study is needed.

No official government investigation has ever publicly concluded that UFOs are indisputably real, physical objects, extraterrestrial in origin, or of concern to national defence. These same negative conclusions also have been found in studies that were highly classified for many years, such as: the U.K.’s Flying Saucer Working Party, 

  1. Project Condign, 
  2. the U.S. CIA-sponsored Robertson Panel, 
  3. the U.S. military investigation into the green fireballs from 1948 to 1951, and
  4. the Battelle Memorial Institute study for the USAF from 1952 to 1955 (Project Blue Book Special Report No. 14).

Some public government reports have acknowledged the possibility of UFOs’ physical reality but have stopped short of proposing extraterrestrial origins, though not dismissing the case entirely. Examples are the Belgian military investigation into large triangles over their airspace in 1989–1991 and the 2009 Uruguayan Air Force study conclusion (see below).

Some private studies have been neutral in their conclusions but argued that the inexplicable core cases call for continued scientific research. Examples are the Sturrock panel study of 1998 and the 1970 AIAA review of the Condon Report.

In Canada, the Department of National Defence has dealt with reports, sightings, and UFOs investigations across Canada. In addition to conducting studies into crop circles in Duhamel, Alberta, it still considers “unsolved” the Falcon Lake incident in Manitoba and the Shag Harbour UFO incident in Nova Scotia.

Shag Harbour Nova Scotia

Early Canadian studies included Project Magnet (1950–1954) and Project Second Storey (1952–1954), supported by the Defence Research Board.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unidentified_flying_object

Quora Question: How many amateur astronomers are there in the world?

Web Answer: Estimated 200,000 to 500,000 amateur astronomers.

Amateur astronomy is a hobby where participants enjoy observing or imaging celestial objects in the sky using the unaided eye, binoculars, or telescopes. Even though scientific research may not be their primary goal, some amateur astronomers make contributions in doing citizen science, such as by monitoring variable stars, double stars, sunspots, or occultations of stars by the Moon or asteroids, or by discovering transient astronomical events, such as comets, galactic novae or supernovae in other galaxies.

Amateur astronomers do not use the field of astronomy as their primary source of income or support. Usually, they have no professional degree in astrophysics or advanced academic training in the subject. Most amateurs are hobbyists, while others have a high degree of astronomy experience and may often assist and work alongside professional astronomers. Many astronomers have studied the sky throughout history in an amateur framework; however, since the beginning of the twentieth century, professional astronomy has become an activity distinguished from amateur astronomy and associated activities.

Amateur astronomers typically view the sky at night, when most celestial objects and astronomical events are visible, but others observe during the daytime by viewing the Sun and solar eclipses. Some look at the sky using nothing more than their eyes or binoculars. Still, more dedicated amateurs often use portable telescopes or telescopes situated in their private or club observatories. Apprentices can also join as members of amateur astronomical societies, which can advise, educate or guide them towards finding and observing celestial objects. They can also promote the science of astronomy among the general public.

Many amateur astronomical societies around the world serve as a meeting point for those interested in amateur astronomy. Members range from active observers with their equipment to “armchair astronomers” who are merely interested in the topic. Societies vary widely in their goals and activities, which may depend on various factors such as geographic spread, local circumstances, size, and membership. For example, a small local society located in the dark countryside may focus on practical observing and star parties. In contrast, a large one based in a major city might have numerous members but be limited by light pollution and thus hold regular indoor meetings with guest speakers instead. Major national or international societies generally publish their journal or newsletter, and some hold large multi-day meetings akin to a scientific conference or convention. They may also have sections devoted to particular topics, such as lunar observation or amateur telescope making.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amateur_astronomy

Add to the Amateurs the worldwide community of professional astronomers is about 10,000. 

We have a vast amount of individuals with their eyes on the sky. No one report a UFO. So with the numbers of sightings, they must come from somewhere else.

My theory is the come from another dimension,

A parallel universe, also known as an alternate universe, or alternate reality, is a hypothetical self-contained plane of existence, co-existing with one’s own. The sum of all possible parallel universes that constitute fact is often called a “multiverse”.

  • Multiverse, the set of multiple universes
  • The many-worlds interpretation of quantum physics.

The Metaverse is a collective virtual shared space, created by the convergence of virtually enhanced physical reality and physically persistent virtual space, including the sum of all virtual worlds, augmented reality, and the Internet. The word “metaverse” is made up of the prefix “meta” (meaning beyond) and the stem “verse”; the term is typically used to describe the concept of a future iteration of the Internet, made up of persistent, shared, 3D virtual spaces linked into a perceived virtual universe.

The multiverse is a group of multiple universes. Together, these universes comprise everything that exists: the entirety of space, time, matter, energy, information, and the physical laws and constants that describe them. The different universes within the multiverse are called “parallel universes”, “other universes”, “alternate universes”, or “many worlds”.

Multiple universes have been in cosmology, physics, astronomy, religion, philosophy, transpersonal psychology, music, and all kinds of literature, particularly in science fiction, comic books and fantasy. In these contexts, parallel universes are also called “alternate universes”, “quantum universes”, “interpenetrating dimensions”, “parallel universes”, “parallel dimensions”, “parallel worlds”, “parallel realities”, “quantum realities”, “alternate realities”, “alternate timelines”, “alternate dimensions” and “dimensional planes”.

The physics community has debated the various multiverse theories over time. Prominent physicists are divided about whether any other universes exist outside of our own.

Some physicists say the multiverse is not a legitimate topic of scientific inquiry. Concerns have been raised about whether attempts to exempt the multiverse from experimental verification could erode public confidence in science and ultimately damage the study of fundamental physics. Some have argued that the multiverse is a philosophical notion rather than a scientific hypothesis because it cannot be empirically falsified. The ability to disprove a theory through scientific experimentation has always been part of the accepted scientific method. Paul Steinhardt has famously argued that no experiment can rule out a theory if it provides for all possible outcomes.

In 2007, Nobel laureate Steven Weinberg suggested that if the multiverse existed, “the hope of finding a rational explanation for the precise values of quark masses and other constants of the standard model that we observe in our Big Bang is doomed, for their values would be an accident of the particular part of the multiverse in which we live.

Alain Juillet
Public Domain

Former French Director Of Intelligence Alain Juillet Says:” I Believes UFOs May Come From Parallel Worlds”.

Abp. Eric Michel

Note:

Shag Harbour is only 2 hours from Oak Island

Oak Island is 2 hours from HOME

My wife’s sister married to a Smith a direct relative of Smith Cove Owner from the series: The Money Pit mystery.

Please Note that I call Oak Island the prestigious name of Hoax Island

Following Blog on Oak Island

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