Ghost

From God and into bondage.” As a result, attempts to contact the dead may lead to unwanted contact with a demon or an unclean spirit, as was said to occur in the case of Robbie Mannheim, a fourteen-year- old Maryland youth. The Seventh-Day Adventist view is that a “soul” is not equivalent to “spirit” or “ghost” (depending on the Bible version), and that save for the Holy Spirit, all spirits or ghosts are demons in disguise. Furthermore, they teach that  in accordance with (Genesis 2:7, Ecclesiastes 12:7), there are only two components to a “soul”, neither of which survives death, with each returning to its respective source.

Christadelphians reject the view of a living, conscious soul after death. The Talmud tells of a being called a shade that is similar to other creatures in that it lives and dies but consists only of a form but lacks matter that forms mass, thus rendering it invisible. Since it has no physical mass it is capable of transporting itself from one end of the world to the other.

Science:

The physician John Ferriar wrote An essay towards a theory of apparitions in 1813 in which he argued that sightings of ghosts were the result of optical illusions. Later the French physician Alexandre Jacques François Brière de Boismont published On Hallucinations: Or, the Rational History of Apparitions, Dreams, Ecstasy, Magnetism, and Somnambulism in 1845 in which he claimed sightings of ghosts were the result of hallucinations.

Joe Nickell of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry wrote that there was no credible scientific evidence that any location was inhabited by spirits of the dead. Limitations of human perception and ordinary physical explanations can account for ghost sightings; for example, air pressure changes in a home causing doors to slam, or lights from a passing car reflected through a window at night. Pareidolia, an innate tendency to recognize patterns in random perceptions, is what some skeptics believe causes people to believe that they have ‘seen ghosts’. Reports of ghosts “seen out of the corner of the eye” may be accounted for by the sensitivity of human peripheral vision. According to Nickell, peripheral vision can easily mislead, especially late at night when the brain is tired and more likely to misinterpret sights and sounds.

According to research in anomalistic psychology visions of ghosts may arise from hypnagogic hallucinations “waking dreams” which are experienced in the transitional states to and from sleep). In a study of two experiments into  alleged hauntings (Wiseman et al. 2003) came to the conclusion “that people consistently report unusual experiences in ‘haunted’ areas because of environmental factors, which may differ across locations.” Some of these factors included “the variance of local magnetic fields, size of location and lighting level stimuli of which witnesses may not be consciously aware”.

Some researchers, such as Michael Persinger of Laurentian University, Canada, have speculated that changes in geomagnetic fields (created, e.g., by tectonic stresses in the Earth’s crust or solar activity) could stimulate the brain’s temporal lobes and produce many of the experiences associated with hauntings. Sound is thought to be another cause of supposed sightings. Richard Lord and Richard Wiseman have concluded that infrasound can cause humans to experience  bizarre feelings in a room, such as anxiety, extreme sorrow, a feeling of being watched, or even the chills. Carbon monoxide poisoning, which can cause changes in perception of the visual and auditory systems, was speculated upon as a possible explanation for haunted houses as early as 1921.

Base on the science and our theology we can affirm that Ghosts do not exist. Re. Eric Michel as a Ghost Hunter is for the investigation of the paranormal issue from the  person(s) living those activities who are studies at Institute of Noetic Sciences We like to know if all phenomena are provoked by the those person(s)claiming the entity.

In our Canon Catechism we have these questions:

17. Does angels exist?

Answer: It have inexplicable accidents or incidents that the only reasonable answers is yes because we have no other explanations. They are pure spirit and we cannot see them, an angel is not a ghost who is a spirit that was link to a human.

18. What is a devil?

Answer: Devils and hell never existed and will never be.

ANGELS

Angels are spirits or thoughts, they do NOT have bodies, so they cannot be seeing, they cannot talk, etc. It does NOT have good angels or bad angels who turn into devils. It have angels who are purely spiritual being and are benevolent beings who act between Christ, the noosphere and Earth, has guardian spirits or a guiding influence. Their roles include protecting and guiding human beings, and carrying out God’s tasks. The term “angel”  also present to various notions of spirits or figures found in many religious traditions. The theological study of angels is known as “angelology”.

The information that we teach concerning angels and the spiritual world in which they dwell from many years of spiritual experiences. All angels are just minds without form. There are NO different orders of angels ,  no ranks or societies of angels.  All angels originate from the Cosmic Christ and the noosphere, their functions are so many that they cannot be enumerated, angels attempt to lead each person to what is good tacitly using the person’s own thoughts.

We don’t believe that we have Guardian Angels, our point of view is that all angels are guardians. The big question as a thought is how they can interact physically with us, our body.  Rev. Eric himself  says:” I’m should be dead something protected me in a motorcycle accident”.

That is the Canon Catechism question number

16. What is a spiritual mystery?

Answer: A spiritual mystery is something that we don’t understand but it can be reveled in an other life. It overpass all created human intelligence.

Influential Christian angelic hierarchy was that put forward by Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite in the 4th or 5th century in his book

On the Celestial Hierarchy .During the Middle Ages, many schemes were proposed about the hierarchy of angels, some drawing on and expanding on Pseudo-Dionysius, others suggesting completely different classifications. According to medieval Christian theologians, the angels are organized into several orders, or “Angelic Choirs”.Pseudo-Dionysius (On the Celestial Hierarchy) and Thomas Aquinas (Summa Theologica) drew on passages from the New Testament, specifically in Galatians 3:26-28, Matthew 22:24-33, Ephesians 1:21-23, and Colossians 1:16, to develop a schema of three Hierarchies, Spheres or Triads of angels, with each Hierarchy containing three Orders or Choirs.

Although both authors drew on the New Testament, the Biblical canon is unclear on the subject, and these hierarchies are considered less definitive than biblical material. As referred to in the theological doctrine of the communion of saints, in Paradise there is a common and unique vision of the truth and contemplation of the Face of God, without any kind of difference between angels or human souls.

The Summa theologiae states that there exist different degree in respect of the creation, about the power of intercession to God and of direct entrustment in the human lives.

tetramorph is a symbolic arrangement of four differing elements, or the combination of four disparate elements in one unit. The term is derived from the Greek tetra, meaning four, and morph, shape.

Archaeological evidence exists showing that early man divided the four quarters of the horizon, or space, later a place of sacrifice, such as a temple, and attributed characteristics and spiritual qualities to each quarter. Alternatively the composite elements were carved into mythic creatures such as the ancient Egyptian, Greek and Babylonian sphinxes of antiquity depicting bull-like bodies with birds-wings, lion’s paws and human faces. Such composite creatures are found in many mythologies.

In Christian art, the tetramorph is the union of the symbols of the Four Evangelists, derived from the four living creatures in the Book of Ezekiel, into a single figure or, more commonly, a group of four figures. Each of the four Evangelists is associated with one of the living creatures, usually shown with wings. The most common association, but not the original or only, is: Matthew the manMark the lionLuke the ox, and John the eagle. In Christian art and iconography, Evangelist portraits are often accompanied by tetramorphs, or the symbols alone used to represent them. Evangelist portraits that depict them in their human forms are often accompanied by their symbolic creatures, and Christ in Majesty is often shown surrounded by the four symbols.

The word comes from the Greek for “four forms” or “shapes”. In English usage each symbol may be described as a tetramorph in the singular, and a group as “the tetramorphs”, but usually only in contexts where all four are included. The tetramorphs were especially common in Early Medieval art, above all in illuminated Gospel books, but remain common in religious art to the present day.

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